I Didn’t Love My Wife When We Got Married

I Didn’t Love My Wife When We Got Married by Chassid in The Middle East. See below for details.

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I’m a ridiculous, emotional, over-sentimental sap.  I guess that’s why I told my wife I loved her on our second date. 

I had tried really hard up to that point to hold it back, honestly.  I wanted to tell her on the first date, but I knew that would probably be weird. I still remember her reaction.  She kind of gave me this half-shy, half-amused smile.  Then she nodded and looked off into the sky.

I wasn’t heartbroken by the response.  I think part of me recognized that she was much smarter and more modest than me. But as time has gone on, I also realized that she knew something that I didn’t.

Like most Hasidic Jews (we both became religious later in life), our dating period lasted a very short time.  After two months of dating, we were engaged.  Three months after that, we were married. And that whole time I was swooning.  This fire was burning in me, a fire that burned just like that second date: I was in love.

But then we got married, and everything changed.

Marriage, quicker than I was ready for, did this thing: it started sucking away that emotion. I tried so hard to keep that fire going, to keep that emotion alight, but it got harder and harder.

I mean, how you can feel that burning love when you’re sitting at the table discussing how to use the last twenty dollars in your bank account? How can you feel it when you get into an argument?

How can you feel it when you think it makes perfect sense to put your socks on the floor after you’re done with them, and she has this crazy idea that they need to go in the laundry basket?

There was no way I could keep that dating fire burning as practicality invaded our lives. And at first, it drove me nuts.  That emotion meant love!  That excitement was how I knew I cared for her!  

But suddenly, life was this grind.  Even when I was with her.  Especially when I was with her. And even worse, it seemed that the harder I tried to be sentimental and lovey-dovey, the less it was reciprocated.

But it wasn’t that she wasn’t giving me love, it just seemed to come at different times. Like, when I offered to do the dishes.  Or make dinner after she had a hard day.  

Or, once we had a daughter, when I shared the responsibility of watching over her. I don’t think I noticed this consciously for a while.  It just kept happening.

But I think it had an effect on me.  Because as our marriage progressed, I found myself offering to help out around the house more and more. And after each time, there would be this look she would give me.  

This look of absolute love.  One that was soft and so beautiful. It took me longer than I care to admit to understand what was happening. But eventually it became clear.  Through giving, through doing things for my wife, the emotion that I had been so desperately seeking naturally came about.

It wasn’t something I could force, just something that would come about as a result of my giving. In other words, it was in the practicality that I found the love I was looking for.

And what was even more interesting was that once I realized this on a conscious level, and started trying to find more opportunities to give, the more we both, almost intuitively, became lovey-dovey.

And now, as I’m a bit older and a bit more experienced with this relationship, I’ve finally come to realize something. Something I haven’t wanted to admit for a long time, but is undeniable.

I didn’t love my wife on that second date. I didn’t love her when we got engaged. I didn’t even love her when we got married. Because love isn’t an emotion.  That fire I felt, it was simply that: emotional fire.  From the excitement of dating a woman I felt like I could marry.  But it wasn’t love.

No, love isn’t an emotion or even a noun.  It’s a verb.  The Hebrew word for love means “giving.”  As putting someone else’s needs above your own. Why wasn’t I getting reciprocal lovey-doveyness when we were first married?  

Because it wasn’t for her.  It was for me.  An emotion I had in my chest. And even when I let it out of my chest, it wasn’t love. Being sappy isn’t love.

Telling someone you love them doesn’t mean that you do. And that’s why my wife just gave me that half-smile.  She knew, even if I didn’t, what love really is.

Read another popular post: Don’t Ever Apologize For Loving Someone – Not Ever! 

This article first appeared as I Didn’t Love My Wife When We Got Married by Chassid in The Middle East first appeared on PopChassid.com. Click on the links to follow him on the social networks!

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4 comments

  • jenn

    jenn

    Wow, can we have this as a homily in the church ?

    Wow, can we have this as a homily in the church ?

  • Felicia Reevers

    Felicia Reevers Tucson, AZ

    Honest, enlightening...and beautiful. Thank you for sharing.

    Honest, enlightening...and beautiful. Thank you for sharing.

  • Colette

    Colette Montetey, CA

    Wow! Love the honesty! Thank you for sharing. What a wonderful reminder of what love really is. Must remember this ne t time I get that feeling!

    Wow! Love the honesty! Thank you for sharing. What a wonderful reminder of what love really is. Must remember this ne t time I get that feeling!

  • Geoff

    Geoff Waterloo, IA

    I wrote this for my wife today, and thought just perfect timing to share based on topic. Other fact, we're separated and working on pulling our 20 years back together. .... So... be inspired to never give up on loving your wife. Dear Carol Ann ; When we STEP beyond what was, they say your taking a step in a new or different direction..... When we JUMP, we imagine for joy or how high we can reach..... When we CLIMB, we strive to reach a new place or obstacle in our journey. ... When we take FLIGHT, we rise above everything to feel free or see beyond our own horizons. ... When we DREAM, we believe that ANYTHING is possible !? When we LOVE, we simply want to experience them with someone very special. ... ALL at once !!!!

    I wrote this for my wife today, and thought just perfect timing to share based on topic. Other fact, we're separated
    and working on pulling our 20 years back together. ....
    So... be inspired to never give up on loving your wife.

    Dear Carol Ann ;
    When we STEP beyond what was, they say your taking a step in a new or different direction.....
    When we JUMP, we imagine for joy or how high we can reach.....
    When we CLIMB, we strive to reach a new place or obstacle in our journey. ...
    When we take FLIGHT, we rise above everything to feel free or see beyond our own horizons. ...
    When we DREAM, we believe that ANYTHING is possible !?
    When we LOVE, we simply want to experience them with someone very special. ... ALL at once !!!!

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